Winter-Proofing the Great Outdoors

We had our first storm this week. No, no snow yet, but we did have a fairly severe windstorm. Wind is almost worse than snow and cold temps because you really have to make sure things are battened down tight so they don’t get destroyed and potentially hurt anyone.

Patio Furniture – It’s highly unlikely that you’ll be dining al fresco during the winter months so if you have indoor storage space where you can stow your furniture, such as a shed, garage or basement, that’s ideal. If you have to leave it out over the winter, make sure it’s secure – we have our bistro set chained to the deck railing. Our deck is also fairly sheltered, so high winds and snow accumulation won’t be that much of an issue. If you have a cover for your set, that will certainly improve it’s lifespan from winter wear and tear.

Grills – How you’ll keep your grill depends on whether or not you’ll want to use it during cold weather. If you don’t intend to use it, just put it away along with your patio furniture after you empty it of ash and coals and clean it out. We like to grill on the milder days in the winter, so we’ll leave our grill out. It’s good to have it in a sheltered location and chained down if necessary. And since grills have lots of pieces, it’s imperative to have a cover on it. That will prevent anything from blowing away and minimize the chances that the grill will become damaged or weather-worn.

Window Boxes – If you’re like me, you’ll want to leave your window boxes and some of your planters out during the winter months. For window boxes, make sure they are securely attached to your home or deck railing. You’ll also want to make sure that you have something sturdy and hardy planted in them (such as ornamental kale). Or, if you go in for evergreen boughs and such, make sure they’re laid in well so they don’t blow away – you can use wire hooks to secure the greens horizontally into the planter. What ever you decide, as long as you’re leaving them up, you’ll need to have something covering your potting soil so it doesn’t all blow off in a strong wind.

Planters and Pots – Some planters you’ll want to bring inside. I always bring in my herb pots, so I have to get some plastic pot coasters for drainage so I can water them indoors without a giant mess. You’ll want to bring in or put away any pottery or terra cotta planters you’re using as ice can damage them fairly easily – the freeze and thaw of water that can get inside can cause the pot to crack. For planters you’re leaving outside, make sure they’re winter proofed. I have a wooden free-standing window box planter, with an earth box nested inside. I’ve got dwarf spruce and creeping juniper planted in it, so I’ll leave it outdoors. However, to protect both the planter and help out the plants, I’m going to insulate the space between the earth box and wood planter box with bubble wrap from packages that are sent into my office – I do love to reuse useless items! In the same vein, you’ll want to think of any plants that need some protection – young fruit trees, roses and some shrubs may need to be wrapped in burlap to protect them from windburn and below zero temperatures.

Garden Tchotchkes – Really, I just like to find a way to use the word ‘tchotchke’ from time to time. But you know the kind of things I mean – wind chimes, lanterns, patio cushions, lawn gnomes. For the most part these types of items should be taken down and put away indoors during the window. If nothing else, getting it out of the elements will prolong it’s useful life. We have a string of white lanterns that we’ll likely take down after Halloween, though in all honesty, we should’ve taken them down prior to the windstorm this week. It was ten o’clock at night when we realized how nasty it was going to get though, and taking down lanterns didn’t seem appealing at that late hour. But we don’t want to tempt fate more than once per season, so we’ll take them down this weekend when we take down our string our of ghost lights that we also have on the back deck – and you should take your lanterns and lights down too! The exception here is outdoor-rated holiday lights – just make you’ve got them safely secured to your deck or whatever. We just staple ours onto the wood railing using hardware staples (being super careful to staple around the wires, not through them – electrocution is bad) but they also sell fancy plastic or metal clips that you can permanently affix to your dwelling, and then string the lights to those. But if you’re careful, really the staples work just fine.

And while you’re at it, you’ll want to have a can of salt or sand by the back and front doors, as well as a shovel. With a little foresight and planning, your outdoor space and garden will do just fine through the winter months.

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